Archive for July, 2010

The Save the Tree Campaign attends a City Parks Presentation

Albert Balagso, Director of SJ Parks spoke for one hour last night discussing
the financial challenges facing the City and especially the City Parks Dept.
The Almaden Valley Community Association hosted the meeting.  11 Friends
Committee members came and 3 Friends Community members attended.  There were
also about 15 other attendees from other parts of  Almaden. We stood out
like a Green Thumb; we were a sea of green shirts in the audience proudly
wearing our Tree #13 Logo T-Shirts!  See the rest of the story here.

Update:  Read the article on the front page of the July 23rd Almaden Times Weekly.   Front page and page 21.

We are now the “MARTIN-FONTANA PARKS ASSOCIATION”

After our inaugural meeting on July 15, 2010, we are now the “Martin-Fontana Parks Association.  With 15 community members in attendance, we now have a  credible organization with elected leaders.  Inaugural meeting minutes.

An Open Letter to PG&E

In a letter to the editor of the Almaden Times Weekly, Dick Stevens & Pier Maggiani respond to PG&E’s tree cuttings on 1 July.

“This is what I call arrogance” says Pier Mangiani

Read in the Almaden Times Weekly what PG&E spokesperson, Tamar Sarkissian, had to say in a written statement.  Now that we have PG&E’s promises in print, can we hold them accountable?  See page 1 & then page 4.

There is no Federal Mandate to kill Trees

In a letter to Steven L. Kline, the Vice President, Corporate Environmental and Federal Affairs and Chief Sustainability Officer of PG&E; “Friends of TJ Martin and Jeffrey Fontana Parks” note that, contrary to what PG&E says, there is no federal mandate to kill trees.  See the letter here.

Don’t forget trees’ long-term benefits

In a July 5th letter to the the editor of the Mercury News, S. Paige Liu writes:

“Regarding the recent tree removal in two Almaden Valley parks: I am surprised, given the number of people who live in this valley, that no one possesses the skill to trim trees in such a way as to allow them to grow safely around power lines. I have noticed some sycamores in my Willow Glen neighborhood that appear to have been pruned, ages ago, in such a way that they grow around the power lines but still exhibit a stable branching structure. Why is it that any time a tree becomes inconvenient, out come the chain saws? We all know the benefits of mature trees. Our valley was orchards not all that long ago. Why is it always the quickest, cheapest solution that wins out over long-term benefit? Any arborists out there who may be reading this: Here’s an opportunity to distinguish your service from all the rest. Make this your niche. Please.”

ABC7 covers the protest

See the video here