Archive for the ‘City of San Jose’ Category

Tired of looking at those UGLY concrete blocks in our Parks?

According to an article published by Julia Baum in the  June 16th. Cambrian Resident, artists are being sought to paint murals on park water vaults.  You can read her article at:  http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/06/13/san-jose-artists-sought-to-paint-murals-on-park-water-vaults/.

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A Budget Letter from San Jose Park Advocates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a letter that Jean Dresden of San Jose Park Advocates is sending to the San Jose City Council regarding the 2017/2018 City Budget.  San Jose Parks Advocates offers these comments on the proposed operating and capital budgets for FY 2017G18:  City Council Budget letter

 

 

San Jose City Council’s Report on Sustainable Park Maintenance

For those who couldn’t attend, here’s a video link to the report on Sustainable Park Maintenance presented on the 22nd of March at the San Jose City Council meeting.

A letter from Jean Dresden of the San Jose Park Advocates

Here’s a letter, dated Feb. 5th, from Jean Dresden.  Jean is a member of the San Jose Park Advocates sjpagroup (an all volunteer group of neighborhood association leaders).  This letter was presented to the San Jose City Council Neighborhood Services & Education, (NSE), committee. In It you will find a good summary of current San Jose park issues.

 

Here’s a link to read the letter:  parkconditionsnse2017feb9item3sjparksadvocates.

 

Adopt-a-Park volunteers save the day

What a great workday, Sunday, February 12! The weather was awesome.  Students from Rancho Milpitas Middle School, San Jose High School and other volunteers met at McAbee to prune roses and weed the Jeffrey Fontana Memorial Rose Garden. Thanks to Adopt-a-Park and PRNS, we had all the necessary tools and support to remove one and a half truck-loads of debris. Thanks to Martin-Fontana Parks Association, volunteers were properly checked in and there was water and snacks to keep everyone focused. The roses were pruned and thinned so that we should have a wonderful 2017 bloom. Work was also done on the east side of McAbee in the two scout projects; and a pile of wood chips, recently delivered to East Fontana, on the east-side of the Golf Creek Bridge, was partially spread. PRNS will be bringing in a small front-loader to help in this process. All in all, we thank those that helped with yesterday’s project.

One word to those of us that use McAbee. When there is a coordinated effort such as this, and it is necessary for volunteers to work curb-side, please exercise caution; please slow down. Those commuting on McAbee in general exceed the posted limit. Even with middle school children negotiating wheelbarrows in the bike path on McAbee, vehicles maintained their speed. So folks, in general, if you see a work party, slow down. Those florescent-pink vested workers and their stewards would appreciate it.

Patrick P. Pizzo,

MFPA Project Coordinator

 

February 2017 Newsletter

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Just click on the photo to download the Newsletter or click here

Pat Pizzo wonders what San Jose was like when the Europeans first settled

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Are you of the opinion that the Guadalupe we see today is the Guadalupe the Spanish encountered when they arrived at the end of the 18th Century? Of course not! San Jose has undergone dramatic growth and Flood Control quickly became a main objective of Valley Water (and the predecessor agencies). Yet we hear of the efforts to bring back the Coho Salmon and the Steelhead Trout.

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In this close-up map, Hervey Lane is about where “The Heirs of M. Hervey” is written. Alma is the border between the Devincenzi and Goldstein Parcels.

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In this overview map, River Glen is at the east-end of the Willow Glen Fruit Union Parcel. That is where the spring is located… at the intersection of Pine and Bird. The intersection of Minnesota and Willow is top-dead-center on the overview map (yes- they do intersect!

Should we not have a baseline idea of what was, before we plow ahead in this conservation effort? This link will explain that the Guadalupe Creek/River was not originally continuous: circa 1777, El Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe [The Town of Saint Joseph of Guadalupe]. The discontinuity occurred near Koch and Lincoln (present day streets) and extended to about Willow Glen Way and Old Almaden Road. Want to know more? Read on!

*Pat Pizzo, who submitted this article, is a long time Martin-Fontana Parks Association member & Project Coordinator.